MIB Discovery
1856 modules enregistr├ęs
Chemin
MIX : 1 (iso). 3 (org). 6 (dod). 1 (internet). 2 (mgmt). 1 (mib-2). 25 (host). 2 (hrStorage). 3 (hrStorageTable)
OID : 1.3.6.1.2.1.25.2.3
TXT : iso. org. dod. internet. mgmt. mib-2. host. hrStorage. hrStorageTable
Enfants
D├ętails
OID1.3.6.1.2.1.25.2.3
Module HOST-RESOURCES-MIB (CISCO)
NomhrStorageTable
Statuscurrent
DescriptionThe (conceptual) table of logical storage areas on the host. An entry shall be placed in the storage table for each logical area of storage that is allocated and has fixed resource limits. The amount of storage represented in an entity is the amount actually usable by the requesting entity, and excludes loss due to formatting or file system reference information. These entries are associated with logical storage areas, as might be seen by an application, rather than physical storage entities which are typically seen by an operating system. Storage such as tapes and floppies without file systems on them are typically not allocated in chunks by the operating system to requesting applications, and therefore shouldn't appear in this table. Examples of valid storage for this table include disk partitions, file systems, ram (for some architectures this is further segmented into regular memory, extended memory, and so on), backing store for virtual memory (`swap space'). This table is intended to be a useful diagnostic for `out of memory' and `out of buffers' types of failures. In addition, it can be a useful performance monitoring tool for tracking memory, disk, or buffer usage.
Module HOST-RESOURCES-MIB (ietf)
NomhrStorageTable
Statuscurrent
DescriptionThe (conceptual) table of logical storage areas on the host. An entry shall be placed in the storage table for each logical area of storage that is allocated and has fixed resource limits. The amount of storage represented in an entity is the amount actually usable by the requesting entity, and excludes loss due to formatting or file system reference information. These entries are associated with logical storage areas, as might be seen by an application, rather than physical storage entities which are typically seen by an operating system. Storage such as tapes and floppies without file systems on them are typically not allocated in chunks by the operating system to requesting applications, and therefore shouldn't appear in this table. Examples of valid storage for this table include disk partitions, file systems, ram (for some architectures this is further segmented into regular memory, extended memory, and so on), backing store for virtual memory (`swap space'). This table is intended to be a useful diagnostic for `out of memory' and `out of buffers' types of failures. In addition, it can be a useful performance monitoring tool for tracking memory, disk, or buffer usage.